Tag: dystopia

Siamese Mayhem finally finishes a series, or, a review of the Chemical Garden Trilogy

Chemical Garden Trilogy

One of the great tragedies of reviewing is that bad books always give me more to say. When I have an actual good book, I just can’t find the snark. Hopefully, it is possible for me to be interesting without making fun of something. However, I promise nothing. The Chemical Garden Trilogy is one of these happy few; they are the sort of books I have only good things to say about. Continue reading “Siamese Mayhem finally finishes a series, or, a review of the Chemical Garden Trilogy”

“My drug habit will save us all, I promise,” or, a review of Take Me Tomorrow

I love drugs. Wait, let me rephrase that. I love reading about the drug industry. The people who take them are moderately interesting, but it’s the drugs themselves and the people who sell them that really fascinate me.

Hence my excitement when I heard of Take Me Tomorrow, by Shannon A. Thompson. Drugs + dystopia? Count me in, please and thank you. While Take Me Tomorrow didn’t completely live up to my expectations, there were things I really appreciated, such as the thread of moral ambiguity running through the narrative.

But first, the plot. Like many YA dystopias, it takes place in an America different from the one we know now. Take Me Tomorrow sets itself apart, however, by centering the story around a drug, tomo. Tomo’s origins are mysterious, but its effects are not: users can see the future, which the current regime does not like at all. As a result, the authorities have declared war on tomo and its…ah, fans. Continue reading ““My drug habit will save us all, I promise,” or, a review of Take Me Tomorrow”

The only thing hotter than an angel is a competent heroine, or, a review of Angelfall

It is a testament to this story that it features a badass, incredibly beautiful angel and yet someone else steals the show. And no, the person who steals the show is not the adorable, funny, hot demon love interest. (Yes, I read Fallen. Yes, I squeed over Cam. Those days are behind me. I think.) It was the heroine. Yes, that’s right. The ordinary, human heroine is the most compelling character.

anime Thor and Loki
This gif accurately captures my emotions.

Continue reading “The only thing hotter than an angel is a competent heroine, or, a review of Angelfall”